Natural landscapes: awesomeness from the mountain top

WINTER AT SUNSHINE MEADOWS, BANFF NATIONAL PARK, ALBERTA

In winter it’s a renowned ski destination, in summer it’s a hikers’ paradise. The fun thing about Sunshine Meadows is it straddles the border between the provinces of Alberta and British Columbia. One of the ski lifts highlights this, with signs indicating when you’ve crossed into British Columbia and when you’ve crossed back. As you can see, the views are beyond spectacular – in colour or in monotone. I went for the latter to truly highlight the eye-popping drama. You can see the colour version here:http://bit.ly/SunshineMeadowsWinter.
Nikon D90, polarizing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book “BLUE SYMPHONY: Winter in the Canadian Rockies”: http://bit.ly/kFb3Xw

Urban landscapes: in the midst of epic silence

NOTRE DAME CATHEDRAL, OTTAWA, ONTARIO

I photographed the exterior a year earlier, but it was too late in the day to get inside. I remedied that a few days ago and was absolutely gobsmacked at the stunning interior. The cathedral is the oldest and largest church in this city, which is Canada’s capital. It was designed a national historic site in 1990.
The main structure was completed in 1846 and the entire building was renovated and restored in the 1990s. Governor General Georges Vanier and Prime Minister Sir Wilfred Laurier were given state funerals here.
One of the many things I like about cathedrals like this is they encourage silence and contemplative prayer, which are rarely found in our culture today.

Nikon D7100, tripod.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Light and Lines: An Urban Landscape Portfolio”: http://bit.ly/LIGHTandLINES

Rural landscapes: the river and the fog

CROWSNEST RIVER AND RAILWAY BRIDGE, LUNDBRECK, ALBERTA

I went to photograph Lundbreck Falls, just downstream from this spot, in mysteriously foggy conditions. Once finished there, I wandered upstream and found this compelling composition. When photographing the falls, the railway bridge often seems to be a barely tolerated intrusion, but it’s key to making this photograph work.
There was barely any colour to be had, so this black-and-white treatment is my favourite. Nevertheless, you can see the scene in colour here: http://bit.ly/FoggyRiver.
Nikon D7100, tripod.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “MOMENTS OF LIGHT: Thirty Years of Photography”: http://bit.ly/JTNnMX

Rural landscapes: welcome to the hay field

THE WINTER FIELDS NEAR CALGARY, ALBERTA

I was intrigued by the fence line and the tracks and how they lead your eyes into the golden hues of the hay field and the distant Canadian Rocky Mountains. A higher vantage point from the adjacent road gave me — and you — a great view of so much that is stunningly beautiful about this province.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd

Urban landscapes: the city sunrise

BOW RIVER AND SKYSCRAPERS, CALGARY, ALBERTA

I arrived and parked the car nearby just in time to capture this scene as sunrise was approaching. The Bow isn’t always this open in late December, so I was delighted with the photographic possibilities it offered.
Nikon D7100, tripod, graduated density (darkening) filter on the sky and buildings.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Light and Lines: An Urban Landscape Portfolio”: http://bit.ly/LIGHTandLINES

Urban landscapes: the gathering of structures

SKYSCRAPERS AT DUSK, CALGARY, ALBERTA

Capturing scenes like this is all about timing. First, it’s only possible during winter months, when darkness descends while most buildings are still fully illuminated. Second, it’s only possible during weekdays, since most lights in most buildings are off on weekends. Once you’ve met these qualifications, prepare to make loooong exposures.
Nikon D7100, tripod.

Click on the picture for a larger view.

Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Light and Lines: An Urban Landscape Portfolio”: http://bit.ly/LIGHTandLINES

Rural landscapes: the epic winter clouds

THE VIEW FROM SKYLINE ROAD, NEAR PINCHER CREEK, ALBERTA

During my Christmas vacation, I was blessed to drive down to the deep south of this western Canadian province just two days after a significant snowfall. That snow, and this gobsmacking sky, made for many very pleasing compositions.
I’m in a black-and-white mood these days and, given the relative lack of colour in this scene — just blue, really — it was a no-brainer to show you the monotone photo (see the full-colour version here: http://bit.ly/AlbertaWinterRoad). BTW, that’s the Canadian Rockies on the horizon.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd

Natural landscapes: the winter badlands viewpoint

WINTER AT HORSETHIEF CANYON, DRUMHELLER, ALBERTA

Named after outlaws who hid their stolen livestock here more than 100 years ago, the edge of this canyon provides stunning (as you can see) views into the badlands below. I was blessed to be there with stunning lighting and just enough snow.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter, graduated density (darkening) filter on the sky.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book THE ALBERTA BADLANDS: A Landscape Portrait”: http://bit.ly/HtBAW6

 

Rural landscapes: standing tall against the sky

GRAIN ELEVATOR IN A BADLANDS LANDSCAPE, DRUMHELLER, ALBERTA

I’ve photographed this landmark before, but knew I could capture something more compelling. This winter day provided the conditions to make that picture. There wasn’t a lot of colour in this scene, so I opted for a black-and-white treatment. This approach often produces more dramatic results.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book THE ALBERTA BADLANDS: A Landscape Portrait”: http://bit.ly/HtBAW6

Rural landscapes: worship in the midst of winter

CHURCH AND CEMETERY, BROCK TOWNSHIP, ONTARIO

I dug deep into the archives to unearth this scene from 2001. At that time, I was still using a film camera, then getting the slides scanned onto CDs. Love the rustic, almost intimate setting that works so well in sunny, snowy conditions.
Pentax 6×7 medium-format film camera (which creates the almost square dimensions), tripod, polarizer

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Ontario”: http://bit.ly/11kOiRk

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