Rural landscapes: the endless summer view

CANOLA FIELD AND ROCKY MOUNTAINS, NEAR PINCHER CREEK, ALBERTA

By the time I found this fabulous viewpoint in late July, the canola blossoms had already passed their peak. But there was still enough colour remaining to add to this captivating vista of many kilometres of prairies and mountains in western Canada.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

Rural landscapes: grazing under the peaks

KILLARNEY COWS, COUNTY KERRY, IRELAND

A fishing expedition deep into the archives landed this tranquil beauty from my 1993 trip to Ireland. I recall the soft evening light was ideal to capture the grazing cattle. The only problem was a dull, blank off-white sky. So I used Photoshop to improve it – not super-saturated, just something that would be realistic with the overall scene.
Nikon FM2 film camera, tripod.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “IRELAND: Visions of Light”: http://bit.ly/IrelandVisionsOfLight

Natural landscapes: me and the new day

MORNING POND, GLENBOW RANCH PROVINCIAL PARK, NEAR COCHRANE, ALBERTA

Since opening to the public in 2011, this 3,300-acre park has become a favourite photo locale in any season. Me and my photography equipment visited on a summer dawn with this unnamed pond in mind. I was surprised to find a new viewing platform and, after initially thinking it might ruin any pictures, I found it to be very useful.
After making a few exposures, I decided to put me into the scene and that involved hitting the camera timer, then sprinting to the correct spot. It took a half-dozen attempts to get me in the centre of the scene. And even as I did it, I knew I would process a version of the resulting photo with me in colour and the rest of the composition in monotone.
Nikon D7100, tripod, graduated density (darkening) filter on the sky.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

Rural landscapes: canoodling with canola

FARM FIELDS NEAR LONGVIEW, ALBERTA

Mid-July is always canola time for me, when I cruise rural roads to find glowing fields of eye-popping yellow canola on the prairies of this western Canadian province. On that morning, I caught a break; the smoky skies of southern Alberta (caused by wildfires in neighbouring British Columbia) cleared up enough to offer a compelling mix of clouds and blue. The next day was, sadly, smokier than ever.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter, graduated density (darkening) filter on the sky.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “MOMENTS OF LIGHT: Thirty Years of Photography”: http://bit.ly/JTNnMX


Natural landscapes: alone with the lake

GREAT LAKES SKY, WHITBY, ONTARIO

I was wandering the leafy, restful lakefront grounds of the Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences when I spotted a solitary bush/tree against a backdrop of lake and brooding sky.
This kind of minimalism usually makes for compelling pictures and that’s certainly the case here. The composition is so uncluttered that pretty much any kind of sky would have worked. In this scene, the sky offers the only significant colour.
Nikon D7100, tripod and, probably, a graduated density (darkening) filter on the sky.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Wander through my photography book “Special Places: A Landscape Photographer’s Vision of Southern Ontario”: http://bit.ly/yNU06F

Rural landscapes: the clash of icons

CANOLA AND OIL PUMP NEAR AIRDRIE, ALBERTA

July is canola season on the prairies of western Canada. That’s when I like to drive country roads looking for good compositions that highlight the glowing yellow canola flowers. This scene highlights canola with an icon of Alberta: the oil pump. Love it when they come together. In fact, this scene made for several compelling pictures. Here’s another one: https://wp.me/p2ccTX-1kb.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

Natural landscapes: the monotone mountain view

PEAKS ALONG THE ICEFIELDS PARKWAY, BANFF NATIONAL PARK, ALBERTA

The light was decent and the sky interesting, so I put a telephoto zoom lens on the camera and captured Rocky Mountain views like this from a viewpoint near the Saskatchewan River crossing. The colour version is good, but going black-and-white increased the drama. A heatwave arrived a few days later and melted many of the snow patches you see here.
Nikon D7100, 70-300 mm. zoom lens, tripod, polarizing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

Natural landscapes: the flowering of summer

LUPINS, REVELSTOKE, BRITISH COLUMBIA

These gorgeous flowers simply grow along the country roads in this mountainous region of western Canada. While on a camping trip, I had fun designing compositions with various colour combinations and arrangements, along with deciding which blooms would be in or out of focus.
Nikon D90, tripod, polarizing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Bring on the Light: Forty years of photography”: https://bit.ly/BringOnTheLight

Natural landscapes: flowing into the canyon

MALIGNE RIVER, JASPER NATIONAL PARK, ALBERTA

You’re looking at this beautiful Canadian Rocky Mountain river just before it enters an incredible canyon, smashing its way through all kinds of waterfalls and rapids before entering the Athabasca River hundreds of metres below. (Here’s a view of that canyon: https://wp.me/p2ccTX-xL.)
Every time my wife and I visit Jasper, we make sure to check out Maligne Canyon because we just can’t get enough of its raw, incredible beauty.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter.

Click/tap on the picture for a larger view.

Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

Natural landscapes: the tangled beauty of falling water

TANGLE FALLS,
JASPER NATIONAL PARK, ALBERTA

One of my all-time favourite waterfall subjects, this stunning beauty is all the more remarkable because it’s literally beside the road (the incredible Icefields Parkway). The water you see here flows under the road and down into a valley hundreds of metres below.
I went with black-and-white because, as is so often the case, removing the colour increases the drama. This waterfall is just as gobsmacking with a coat of autumn snow: https://wp.me/p2ccTX-JO (note the difference in the amount of water).
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

Click on the picture for a larger view.

Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Bring on the Light: Forty years of photography”: https://bit.ly/BringOnTheLight

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