Natural landscapes: the stunning autumn lake view

LAKE AGNES AND THE LAKE LOUISE SKI RESORT, BANFF NATIONAL PARK, ALBERTA

I’d forgotten about this absolutely stunning scene until fishing around in the archives to find material for my 2020 anniversary book, “Bring On The Light”. I remember it was an unbelievable day in 2010 when conditions were so perfect that almost everything I aimed the camera at produced a “keeper” photo.
This view is from the far end of the Lake Agnes, which hangs in a valley high above Lake Louise. Using a long telephoto lens compressed the distance between the Lake Agnes teahouse and the resort across the valley, making for a picture with gobsmacking drama. Another, wider-angle view from the same spot puts the teahouse in a broader autumn landscape: https://wp.me/p2ccTX-bh.
Nikon D90, tripod, polarizing filter

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Natural landscapes: never too early for snow

FORTY MILE CREEK, BANFF NATIONAL PARK, ALBERTA

While it’s rare in non-winter months, snow can happen any time of year in the Canadian Rockies. It created delicate, incredibly photogenic conditions along the Fenland Loop, a trail which includes this stream, on a cool September morning. The colour version had very little colour, so I created this monotone version to increase the drama.
Nikon D7100, tripod.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my NEW coffeetable book, “Bring on the Light: Forty years of photography”: https://bit.ly/BringOnTheLight

Urban landscapes: the downtown lights

FIFTH AVENUE PLACE AND SUNRISE SKY, CALGARY, ALBERTA

There aren’t many water features amongst this western Canadian city’s skyscrapers; the climate simply doesn’t allow for it. However, a recent redevelopment of the public space at Fifth Avenue Place introduced these subtle fountains. Combined with pre-dawn light and colourful clouds, the scene became magical for a long exposure.
Nikon D7100, tripod.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Light and Lines: An Urban Landscape Portfolio”: http://bit.ly/LIGHTandLINES

Rural landscapes: encased in Arctic stone

INUIT CEMETERY, BAKER LAKE, NUNAVUT

While on a work visit to this northern community–which is the geographic centre of Canada–I had time to visit this extraordinary place and ponder the lives lived in a treeless tundra entirely dependent on the distant outside world for food (the exception: caribou meat), fuel, building materials, vehicles and almost everything else you can think of. And that includes wood for cemetery crosses.
Notice all the graves are above ground and covered in rocks? This is the land of permafrost, so the kind of burial southern Canadians are accustomed to isn’t possible here. That might be why the cemetery is very near to a field of endless boulders.
Nikon D7100, polarizing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my NEW coffeetable book, “Bring on the Light: Forty years of photography”: https://bit.ly/BringOnTheLight

Natural landscapes: the abstract flow

WATERFALL CLOSE-UP, LIVINGSTONE FALLS PROVINCIAL RECREATION AREA, ALBERTA

Livingstone River flows down a wide, flat Rocky Mountain incline that creates all kinds of photo possibilities. By going for a long exposure, I turned the fast flow into silken, diagonal lines. The result is a surreal picture which puts artistry ahead of literal reality.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter and, possibly, a neutral density (darkening) filter.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my NEW coffeetable book, “Bring on the Light: Forty years of photography”: https://bit.ly/BringOnTheLight

Natural landscapes: morning, before the rain

SHEEP RIVER PROVINCIAL PARK, KANANASKIS COUNTRY, ALBERTA

I lived just an hour away from this stunning place for more than a decade before finally venturing into it and finding my mind exploding at the creative possibilities. The park protects part of the Sheep River Valley and that’s the bit of canyon you see at the upper centre. There’s a waterfall another half-hour up the road into the mountains that’s on my bucket list.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter, graduated density (darkening) filter on the sky.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my NEW coffeetable book, “Bring on the Light: Forty years of photography”: https://bit.ly/BringOnTheLight

Rural landscapes: the silent, peaceful morning

CHESLEY LAKE, ALLENFORD, ONTARIO

While staying at the Lake Huron cottage owned by my brother-in-law and his wife, I had time to check maps and find all the lakes in this region of southwest Ontario. Chesley Lake is one of them and this spot is particularly picturesque. I like how the docks subtly encourage you to explore various parts of the picture.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter, graduated density (darkening) filter on the sky.

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Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Ontario”: http://bit.ly/11kOiRk

Rural landscapes: baking in the summer heat

ANCIENT WAGON, REDCLIFF, ALBERTA

Oh man, it was hot. Really, really hot. But I couldn’t pass up this weathered beauty of a wagon near the road and under a checkerboard Canadian prairie sky. So I sweated for nearly a half-hour, searching out interesting compositions like this. The colour version is good, but as is often the case, going monotone increased the dramatic impact.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

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Natural landscapes: looking down to see up

REFLECTIONS ON UPPER KANANASKIS LAKE, PETER LOUGHEED PROVINCIAL PARK, ALBERTA

It was a glorious, almost-windless morning in the Canadian Rockies, where almost every scene I photographed resulted in a stunning picture. Amidst the obvious photos, I tried something different for this scene, showing you the soaring peaks via their reflection. Here’s another Upper Kananaskis Lake scene from that same unforgettable morning: http://wp.me/p2ccTX-xQ.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my NEW coffeetable book, “Bring on the Light: Forty years of photography”: https://bit.ly/BringOnTheLight

Natural landscapes: the Rocky Mountain waterfall

TROLL FALLS, KANANASKIS COUNTRY, ALBERTA

An easy 1.7-kilometre walk through an aspen forest brings you to this surprise waterfall in the Canadian Rockies.
This is the lower falls; there is an upper cascade, but the trail is steeper and I’ve yet to get there. I’ve put it on my photo bucket list. Troll Falls ices over beautifully in winter. Here’s the evidence: https://wp.me/p2ccTX-A9
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter.

Click on the picture for a larger view.

Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

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