Rural landscapes: under the epic sunrise sky

THE VIEW FROM HORSE CREEK ROAD, NEAR COCHRANE, ALBERTA

I was absolutely blessed with a stunning cloudscape that caused me to stop several times to try out various photo compositions. The key was simply to wait for the sun to shine between clouds. This was one of those sublime moments. Thanks, God! 🙂
Nikon D7100, tripod.

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Natural landscapes: joining the river

STREAM FLOWING INTO THE BOW RIVER,
CALGARY, ALBERTA

I crossed a pedestrian bridge over the Bow River, which flows through the centre of this western Canadian city, then I looked back and saw an unnamed stream flowing into the river.
It was a precarious series of steps over and around boulders to get from the pathway above to the river’s edge but, as you can see, well worth the effort. The setting moon added nicely to the overall scene.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter, two graduated density (darkening) filters on the sky.

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Rural landscapes: the road to darkness

RANGE ROAD 13, AIRDRIE, ALBERTA

The curve of this prairie road has attracted me and my camera more than once, so when I went searching for images in murky, foggy spring weather, this scene stopped me once again. I used a filter to darken the sky and create a sense of foreboding. Turning everything but the centre lines into black-and-white emphasized the mood I was going for. (That said, you can see the full-colour version here: http://bit.ly/AirdrieRoad.)
Nikon D7100, tripod, graduated density (darkening) filter on the sky.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Bring on the Light: Forty years of photography”: https://bit.ly/BringOnTheLight

Natural landscapes: where the spring flows

WATERFALL AT BIG HILL SPRINGS
PROVINCIAL PARK, ALBERTA

One of my reliable photo locations (no matter what the weather or time of year), near my home in Calgary, has been closed for a year for rehabilitation. So I fished back into the archives and found this scene from 2014.
There are nearly a dozen waterfalls of varying sizes and shapes at Big Hill Springs; the viewpoint you see here is so close to the water that I needed a wide-angle lens to take it all in.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

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Natural landscapes: the glorious spring sunrise

DAWN AT SOUTH GLENMORE PARK, CALGARY, ALBERTA

I woke up pondering potential photos locales in what was supposed to be a cloudy dawn, but when I saw there would probably be a good sunrise, I rapidly changed plans and drove to the Glenmore Reservoir (the primary source of drinking water for this western Canadian city). As you can see, it was a good decision.
The spindly tree trunk you see here was pointed at me when I arrived at this spot. That wouldn’t work for the photo, so I managed to turn it and create a stronger visual point of interest in the picture’s bottom half.
Nikon D7100, tripod, graduated density (darkening) filter on the sky.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

Natural landscapes: a badlands encounter

SPRING AT DINOSAUR PROVINCIAL PARK, ALBERTA

Dinosaur Provincial Park is one of the richest fossil areas on the planet. Forty dinosaur species have been discovered at the park – a UNESCO World Heritage Site about two hours’ drive from my home – and more than 500 specimens have been removed and exhibited in museums around the globe.
The weather was supposed to be clear, but that didn’t happen ’til late morning so I improved, usually keeping the dull sky out of each photo and concentrating on the fascinating badland shapes and textures.
This image is compelling because it’s difficult to tell if you’re looking at a compact section of landscape, or dozens of kilometres photographed from a plane. It’s the former. 🙂
Nikon D7100, tripod

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Natural landscapes: say hello to the new day

BOW RIVER, WYNDHAM-CARSELAND PROVINCIAL PARK, ALBERTA

As you can see, spring takes its time arriving in southern Alberta, but it’s always worth the wait. I was blessed to find a high vantage point to photograph this part of the park, which is southeast of Calgary. The lack of wind was also a rare and welcome factor. Here’s another Wyndham-Carseland Provincial Park photo from the same morning: https://wp.me/p2ccTX-1iz.
Nikon D7100 tripod, polarizing filter, graduated density (darkening) filter on the sky.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

Urban landscapes: this way to the party

HALLWAY TO SKYWALKERS LOUNGE, CARIBBEAN PRINCESS

On the final day of our 2017 Ireland-UK cruise, I was up at 4 a.m. to make long-exposure pictures like this aboard the Caribbean Princess cruise ship. Skywalkers was a throbbing dance club at night, but in the day it was a silent respite from the rest of the ship.
My wife and I spent a delightful afternoon in the lounge’s comfy chairs, looking out the windows to distant North Atlantic wind turbines, reading and occasionally eavesdropping on nearby conversations.
Nikon D7100, tripod.

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Check out my coffeetable book, “Light and Lines: An Urban Landscape Portfolio”: http://bit.ly/LIGHTandLINES

Rural landscapes: a walk in spring glory

BUTCHART GARDENS, BRENTWOOD BAY, BRITISH COLUMBIA

This 55-acre tourist attraction, crafted out of a limestone quarry, is a National Historic Site of Canada and employs 50 full-time gardeners. It’s truly a gobsmacking place to visit (and more than a million people think so each year).
The lighting was harsh and difficult when I made this picture (cloudy conditions would have been better), but a lot of Photoshopping made the best of the situation. Nikon D90, polarizing filter.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my NEW coffeetable book, “Bring on the Light: Forty years of photography”: https://bit.ly/BringOnTheLight

Natural landscapes: hangin’ with the boulders

STARFISH, COX BAY, VANCOUVER ISLAND,
BRITISH COLUMBIA

Starfish usually hang out together in twisted configurations, so to find one flying solo in a compelling west coast landscape was a bonus.
I spent almost a half-hour trying various compositions; I like this one best because you see the starfish in its larger setting — and what a stunning setting it is!
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter, fill-flash.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my NEW coffeetable book, “Bring on the Light: Forty years of photography”: https://bit.ly/BringOnTheLight

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