Natural landscapes: the peaceful spring forest

FLOODED CREEK, ST. CLEMENTS, ONTARIO

I was blessed to have access to this forest, near Kitchener-Waterloo, in overcast conditions. While that meant I had to keep the bland, distracting sky out of my pictures, it also meant the lighting was soft and even – ideal for making forest photos. The new grass really did glow like this.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Wander through my photography book “Special Places: A Landscape Photographer’s Vision of Southern Ontario”: http://bit.ly/yNU06F

Rural landscapes: fellowship with the dawn

APPROACHING SUNRISE, PICKERING, ONTARIO

During a recent trip to this central Canadian province, I wanted to visit a new area for sunrise photography. During all my years living in this region, I’d never checked out Frenchman’s Bay, so that’s where I went.
As you can see, it turned out well. That’s Lake Ontario on the right and, on the horizon, the Pickering Nuclear Plant. A man going for a early walk graciously posed for me, providing a silhouetted human element that draws your eyes to it.
Nikon D7100, tripod, enhancing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Ontario”: http://bit.ly/11kOiRk

Natural landscapes: the spring flower

PURPLE TRILLIUM, LOUTH CONSERVATION AREA, JORDAN STATION, ONTARIO

My wife and I recently returned from a vacation in Ontario where I had many opportunities to make pictures. One goal was to photograph trilliums, the province’s official flower, for the first time in many years. I feared I was too early to succeed, but this conservation area, on my final photo outing, was awash in trilliums. Almost all were white, but this one burgundy blossom made for what I hope is a pretty compelling picture. Do you agree?
Nikon D7100, tripod, 70-300mm zoom lens

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Wander through my photography book “Special Places: A Landscape Photographer’s Vision of Southern Ontario”: http://bit.ly/yNU06F

Rural landscapes: the final resting place

ANCIENT TRUCK IN A SPRING LANDSCAPE, KNEEHILL COUNTY, ALBERTA

After driving many times past an old, reddish building amongst a grove of trees in the middle of prairie valley, I decided to stop and investigate. To my very pleasant surprise, I found this old, abandoned truck beside the building and I spent more time photographing it than the structure.
The key was getting the camera high enough to put the top of the truck below the horizon. I extended the tripod as far as possible, then carefully balanced on a downed tree trunk to find the exact composition and make the picture.
Nikon D7100, fill-flash, tripod, polarizing filter, graduated density (darkening) filter on the sky

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Bring on the Light: Forty years of photography”: https://bit.ly/BringOnTheLight

Urban landscapes: illuminating the place of worship

BRIDGE STREET UNITED CHURCH, BELLEVILLE, ONTARIO

I’m always on the lookout for wonderful old architecture to photograph, so while I was in this eastern Ontario city, I visited several downtown churches.
I loved this window, but it was a challenge to capture until deciding to including these posts.
Nikon D7100, tripod

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Light and Lines: An Urban Landscape Portfolio”: http://bit.ly/LIGHTandLINES

Rural landscapes: the endless space

SPRING PRAIRIES NEAR CROSSFIELD, ALBERTA

Whenever I go for a drive near my home in Calgary, I’m always gobsmacked by the sense of endless space offered by the prairies of western Canada. In this scene, I loved how the grove of trees gives your eyes a place to begin your trip through the composition.
There was one other tree in the scene, near the right border, but I removed it to keep the photo as simple as possible. That’s also why I created a monotone version to show you (and here’s the colour version: https://bit.ly/SpringPrairies).
Nikon D7100, 70-300mm zoom lens, tripod, polarizing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Bring on the Light: Forty years of photography”: https://bit.ly/BringOnTheLight

Rural landscapes: the blooms of spring

FLOWERS AT JACK’S HOME, NEAR SYLVAN LAKE, ALBERTA

I was making pictures of a beautiful barn and fences along the roadside when the owner came along on his ATV and generously invited me onto his property to photograph wherever I like. It was a rare blessing, so I took full advantage and this charming creation was one of the things that grabbed my attention.
The encounter turned into something else entirely when Jack asked me some photography-related questions about pictures of his wife. Turns out she had died just a few months before and Jack was struggling to keep going. The Spirit prompted me to ask if I could pray for him right then and there. He graciously agreed and the resulting prayer was as much a help to me as I hope it was to Jack.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

Rural landscapes: April’s cold mornings

FROST ALONG THE FENCE, DRUMHELLER, ALBERTA

Spring? Well, it was -8c when I drove to the amazing badlands in this western Canadian province, so I was glad to have a winter coat & boots, gloves and a toque. The weather forecast suggested a sunny dawn, but the overcast conditions allowed for the overnight frost to stick around longer. And that opened the door to photographing compelling big landscapes and, like this, intimate portraits.
Nikon D7100, 70-300mm zoom lens, tripod.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

Natural landscapes: water for a parched land

KAMLOOPS LAKE, NEAR KAMLOOPS, BRITISH COLUMBIA

This 29-kilometre lake is in the middle of semi-arid desert that receives only about 10 inches of rain annually. But it’s fed by the Thompson River, which enters at the east end and exits at the west end. I loved the fascinating landscape and the contrast between very wet and very dry.
Nikon D90, tripod.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “MOMENTS OF LIGHT: Thirty Years of Photography”: http://bit.ly/JTNnMX

Rural landscapes: under the threatening sky

SPRING POND NEAR AIRDRIE, ALBERTA

Every April and May, I tour the prairies of this western Canadian province searching out compelling ponds of melted snow. I’m often rewarded by scenes like this, captured just a little north of my home in Calgary.
Nikon D7100, tripod, two graduated density (darkening) filters on the sky.

Click/tap on the picture for a larger view.

Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

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