Rural landscapes: the road through Autumn

TREES ALONG THE ROAD, PRESQUILE PROVINCIAL PARK, BRIGHTON, ONTARIO

I was a little early for full-on fall colour glory, but a few scenes like this still made the trip to this wonderful park (my first in 10 years) worthwhile. Given the mix of bright sun and dark shadows, this scene was a tricky exposure to pull off, but I think I did OK. The wide-angle perspective makes the trees appear to soaring over your head.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter.

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Natural landscapes: the autumn river view

MANUELS RIVER, CONCEPTION BAY SOUTH, NEWFOUNDLAND

The Avalon Peninsula, in this eastern Canadian province, is filled with astonishing ocean views, rivers and waterfalls. This river has a stunning set of cascades of which I made many pictures, but then I wandered through the shoreline forest until finding a spot that featured this charming view.
A loooong exposure smoothed out the flowing water and highlighted the little rapids. Like all the rivers in Newfoundland, this one flows directly into the Atlantic Ocean.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

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Rural landscapes: from the lake to the ocean

QUIDI VIDI CREEK, ST. JOHN’S, NEWFOUNDLAND

Pronounced “Kiddy Viddy” by the locals, this charming little east-coast Canadian village is overloaded with colourful homes, a few restaurants, and stunning views.
If you enlarge this photo, you’ll quickly notice that I visited on a very windy day. But all that glorious autumn colour, plus a fast-flowing stream (connecting Quidi Vidi Lake to Quidi Vidi Harbour), still made for what I think is a pretty compelling picture.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter.

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Rural landscapes: the clash of autumn and winter

TIRE TRACKS AND FALLEN LEAVES, KANANASKIS COUNTRY, ALBERTA

I drove into this parking lot in the Canadian Rocky Mountains intending to see if there were any good autumn landscapes. Then I saw how the snowy tire tracks were interacting with thousands of newly fallen leaves and forgot all about the landscapes.
Intimate scenes like this, with the tracks leading you through the random (yet artistic) scatterings of leaves, fascinated me for the next 45 minutes.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

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Rural landscapes: the snowy autumn drive

ROAD THROUGH THE FOREST, BANFF NATIONAL PARK, ALBERTA

I was delighted to find a thick coat of wet snow when I visited this park in the Canadian Rockies. A single set of tire tracks near a picnic area grabbed my attention; I like the solitary silence in this scene. And the lack of strong colour made turning the picture into black & white an easy decision. I darkened the sky considerably so it would complement, rather than compete, for your attention with the snowy road .
Nikon D7100, tripod.

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Natural landscapes: the mirrored autumn pool

FALL AT INGLEWOOD BIRD SANCTUARY, CALGARY, ALBERTA

Visit here at the exact right time, in the right weather, and you’re practically guaranteed to come away with a camera full of eye-popping, almost flourescent photographs of the glory of autumn.
Although I usually go there for landscape pictures, Inglewood is a birder’s paradise. It’s also near the mighty Bow River, which flows out of the Canadian Rocky Mountains, so there are good photo opportunities there, too.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter, enhancing filter (probably), graduated density (darkening) filter on the sky.

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Rural landscapes: walking the autumn path

TRAIL ALONG THE RED DEER RIVER, DRUMHELLER, ALBERTA

I visited this wonderful Canadian badlands photography mecca at the height of autumn, spending an entire day finding very compelling scenes almost everywhere I looked. Encountering this glowing red bush, I decided to go with a very shallow depth of field so your eyes can enjoy the foliage, then wander along the pathway under a canopy of brilliant yellow.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

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Natural landscapes: the roadside splash of autumn

FALL COLOURS NEAR COCHRANE, ALBERTA

I was finishing a day-long trip to capture autumn colour (and autumn snow in the Canadian Rockies), ambling back to my home in Calgary, when this stand of aspens and bush made me stop the car. I like the wall of yellow backing up the brilliant red bush.

Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

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Natural landscapes: a touch of fall in the badlands

AUTUMN BUSH NEAR DRUMHELLER, ALBERTA

I was wandering around the lookout point for Horsethief Canyon, a place of some history in the badlands of western Canada, when I spotted this colourful bush.
The mix of autumn red and the dramatic badlands background made for a great combination. The canyon is named after outlaws who hid their stolen livestock here more than 100 years ago.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

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Urban landscapes: the place for worship & contemplation

ST. MICHAEL’S CATHEDRAL BASILICA, TORONTO, ONTARIO

Given this cathedral is in Canada’s largest city, I walked in expecting an ornate interior similar to what I encountered at cathedrals in Newfoundland (https://wp.me/p2ccTX-15a) and Quebec (https://wp.me/p2ccTX-cq).
That this cathedral’s creators were satisfied with something less overwhelming didn’t lessen my interest in appreciating and photographing the awe-inspiring space.
The city’s first bishop, Michael Power, was instrumental in the cathedral’s construction. He arranged to buy the land (part of the cost coming out of his pocket) in 1845 and construction began that year.
The bishop never saw the cathedral completed; he died two years later from typhus, contracted while ministering to sick people who fled famine-era Ireland. The building, designed by Anglo-Canadian architect William Thomas, was dedicated and consecrated in 1848.

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