Rural landscapes: cutting through the lines of light

ROAD THROUGH THE VALLEY NEAR PINCHER CREEK, ALBERTA

The view from the top of the hill was amazing. So many artistic, mildly diagnonal lines of autumn snow clinging to the rib-like ridges. Then the dirt road bisecting it all and guiding your eyes through the scene. Love it!
I deliberately omitted the sky because it contributed nothing to the artistry below. And there was only warm brown to serve as colour, so I went monotone to remove that distraction. That might make the resulting photo less attractive to some, but that’s OK. I make pictures for me and if there are others appreciate them, great!  🙂
Nikon D7100, tripod, 70-300 mm. zoom lens.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “MOMENTS OF LIGHT: Thirty Years of Photography”: http://bit.ly/JTNnMX

Rural landscapes: where do I fit in?

SURVEYING THE LANDSCAPE NEAR PINCHER CREEK, ALBERTA

I liked how the beautiful, snowy, hilly landscape sloped down to the country road; I just knew there needed to be a focal point to the place where your eyes were being guided. So I set the time delay on the camera and galloped back and forth to this spot almost a half-dozen times. This one is where I was best positioned. Converting all the picture except me into black-and-white helped emphasize where you eyes are supposed to start in this scene. (The full-colour photo is here: http://bit.ly/MeAndTheWorld.)
Nikon D7100, tripod, graduated density (darkening) filter on the sky

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4

Natural landscapes: path through the autumn woods

NOVEMBER IN VICTORIA PARK, CHARLOTTETOWN, PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

Sadly, my visit to this charming eastern Canadian city happened too late to capture the full glory of fall colours. Nevertheless, there were charming, subtle scenes like this to capture in the city’s largest park, even in overcast conditions.
Nikon D7100, tripod.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “MOMENTS OF LIGHT: Thirty Years of Photography”: http://bit.ly/JTNnMX

Natural landscapes: the prairie vista

PRAIRIE VIEW FROM HEAD SMASHED IN BUFFALO JUMP, ALBERTA

There are incredible vistas from this historic western Canada UNESCO world heritage site. Hundreds of years ago, at least one herd of buffalo was driven over the cliffs here by indigenous hunters, then harvested at the bottom over a period of months. The multi-level interpretive centre illustrates a hunt and First Nations life before the arrival of Europeans and the Canadian Pacific Railway, which changed the prairies forever. It’s a fascinating place to visit.
Nikon D50, polarizing filter.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4

 

Urban landscapes: the rush of traffic

MORNING RUSH HOUR ON SIXTH AVENUE, CALGARY, ALBERTA

There’s a trick to getting the best possible long exposure traffic photos in big cities; you want to be there when there are lots of vehicles, but you also want to have as much light as possible from the surrounding skyscrapers, so they’re not just black silhouettes against the sky. In this western Canadian city, that means making photos on fall, winter or early spring weekdays. That’s when I made this picture.
Nikon D7100, tripod.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Light and Lines: An Urban Landscape Portfolio”: http://bit.ly/LIGHTandLINES

Urban landscapes: soaring over the bay

NORRIS WHITNEY BRIDGE, BELLEVILLE, ONTARIO

Completed in 1982, this bridge connects the city of Belleville (about 90 minutes’ drive east of Toronto, Canada’s largest city) with Prince Edward County, an island thrust into Lake Ontario. It’s named for a politician who served for 20 years in the Ontario provincial parliament.
The swooping lines of the bridge, along with the concrete rectangular frames it sits on, made it an attractive photo subject (you can see the bridge at dawn here: https://wp.me/p2ccTX-1hi).
For this picture – converted into black-and-white because there was very little colour in the scene – I went for as long an exposure as possible to smooth out the water and allow the clouds to blur as they moved across the sky.
Nikon D7100, tripod, Lee ‘Big Stopper’ neutral density (darkening) filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Light and Lines: An Urban Landscape Portfolio”: http://bit.ly/LIGHTandLINES

 

Rural landscapes: from the harbour to the ocean

HARBOUR VIEW, ST. JOHN’S, NEWFOUNDLAND

I had a day to visit this incredibly photogenic east-coast Canadian city, so I ranged as far and wide as possible. Amazing that iconic, rural Newfoundland scenes like this are actually within city limits. The modern boat on the left was a challenge; it was so bright that I had to work with Photoshop to keep it from simply bleaching out and causing a visual distraction.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter, graduated density (darkening) filter on the sky.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “MOMENTS OF LIGHT: Thirty Years of Photography”: http://bit.ly/JTNnMX

Rural landscapes: the road through Autumn

TREES ALONG THE ROAD, PRESQUILE PROVINCIAL PARK, BRIGHTON, ONTARIO

I was a little early for full-on fall colour glory, but a few scenes like this still made the trip to this wonderful park (my first in 10 years) worthwhile. Given the mix of bright sun and dark shadows, this scene was a tricky exposure to pull off, but I think I did OK. The wide-angle perspective makes the trees appear to soaring over your head.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Wander through my coffeetable photography book “Special Places: A Landscape Photographer’s Vision of Southern Ontario”: http://bit.ly/yNU06F

Natural landscapes: the autumn river view

MANUELS RIVER, CONCEPTION BAY SOUTH, NEWFOUNDLAND

The Avalon Peninsula, in this eastern Canadian province, is filled with astonishing ocean views, rivers and waterfalls. This river has a stunning set of cascades of which I made many pictures, but then I wandered through the shoreline forest until finding a spot that featured this charming view.
A loooong exposure smoothed out the flowing water and highlighted the little rapids. Like all the rivers in Newfoundland, this one flows directly into the Atlantic Ocean.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “MOMENTS OF LIGHT: Thirty Years of Photography”: http://bit.ly/JTNnMX

Rural landscapes: from the lake to the ocean

QUIDI VIDI CREEK, ST. JOHN’S, NEWFOUNDLAND

Pronounced “Kiddy Viddy” by the locals, this charming little east-coast Canadian village is overloaded with colourful homes, a few restaurants, and stunning views.
If you enlarge this photo, you’ll quickly notice that I visited on a very windy day. But all that glorious autumn colour, plus a fast-flowing stream (connecting Quidi Vidi Lake to Quidi Vidi Harbour), still made for what I think is a pretty compelling picture.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter.

Click on the picture for a larger view.

Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “MOMENTS OF LIGHT: Thirty Years of Photography”: http://bit.ly/JTNnMX

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